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Submission open for the Special Issue of MDPI Geosciences: "Volcanic Plumes: Impacts on the Atmosphere and Insights into Volcanic Processes", Deadline extended to 15 October 2017!

Guest Editors: Pasquale Sellitto, Giuseppe Salerno and Andrew McGonigle

Deadline extended to 15 October 2017!

More information at: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/geosciences/special_issues/volcanic_processes

Submission open for the Special Issue of MDPI Geosciences: "Volcanic Plumes: Impacts on the Atmosphere and Insights into Volcanic Processes"

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Volcanoes release plumes of gas and ash to the atmosphere, during episodes of passive and explosive behaviour. These ejecta have important implications for the chemistry and composition of the troposphere and stratosphere, with the capacity to al

ter Earth's radiation budget and climate system over a range of temporal and spatial scales. In particular, volcanogenic sulphur dioxide reacts to form sulphate aerosols, which increase global albedo, e.g., reducing surface temperatures, in addition to perturbing the formation processes and micro-physics, and therefore the optical/radiative properties, of low and high clouds. In addition, the diabatic radiative processes due to volcanic aerosols and subsequently formed clouds can alter the vertical stability and motion of the atmosphere. Released halogen species can also alter the oxidation capacity of the troposphere, and explosive eruptions cause the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Volcanic degassing, furthermore, played a key role in the formation of Earth’s atmosphere and volcanic plumes can degrade local and regional air quality, generate acid rain, pose hazards to aviation and human health, as well as damaging ecosystems. The chemical compositions and emission rates of volcanic plumes are also monitored, via a range of direct sampling and remote sensing instrumentation, in order to gain insights into subterranean processes, in respect of the magmatic bodies these volatiles exsolve from. Given the significant role these gases play in driving activity, e.g., via pressurisation, this is proving to be an increasingly fruitful means of improving our understanding of volcanic systems, potentially in concert with observations from geophysics and contributions from fluid dynamical modelling of conduit dynamics.

This Special Issue is aimed at presenting state of the art, multi-disciplinary science concerning all aspects of volcanic plumes, of relevance to the volcanology, climatology and atmospheric science communities. 

Authors are encouraged to submit articles with respect to the following topics:

  • Novel and improved techniques for direct and remote (including satellite based) observations of gas and aerosols in volcanic plumes;
  • Use of volcanic degassing data to improve our understanding of volcanic and hydrothermal processes;
  • Satellite-based techniques and modelling studies which improve constraints upon the location and spatio-temporal dispersion of volcanic plumes;
  • Chemical processes occurring within volcanic plumes and plume impacts upon atmospheric composition, aerosol and cloud parameters;
  • Impact of volcanic emissions on local and regional air quality;
  • Direct (aerosol-radiation interactions) and indirect (aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions) climatic impacts of volcanic plumes over a range of spatio-temporal scales;
  • Dynamical, chemical and micro-physical modelling tools and their application to refine and better describe the temporal and spatial evolution of volcanic plumes.

 

We invite you to submit your manuscripts. Both research articles and reviews will be considered for publication.

Dr. Pasquale Sellitto
Dr. Giuseppe Salerno
Dr. Andrew McGonigle
Guest Editors